The Lady from Polk

A limerick for a fellow animal advocate on her 44th birthday.

The State of Georgia, and many other US states, have outdated policies governing the welfare of animals under their jurisdiction.  The state Department of Agriculture implements policies that have been made in the state capital by elected officials.

Unfortunately, many policies being made, or outdated ones being upheld, don’t reflect the will of the people, but instead, are simply voted on according to the opinions/values of those elected to office. Did you know that many of the bills that come up on the floor for votes (in all levels of government) are NOT even READ by the officials before they cast their votes! That’s an absurd way to run anything…and especially a government, yet it is common practice.

Votes and voices heard from constituents will be the catalyst that brings about change in policy and practices.  Learn how government works and how it affects your specific topic of advocacy. Become educated in local politics, study those running for office, vote for the one who most closely aligns with your vision and your ethical standards – locally, statewide, and nationally.  You can, and do, make a difference….unless, of course, you get Trumped. Oh, my. I didn’t just say that.

On to the limerick:

Continue reading “The Lady from Polk”

Ode to the Self-employed

Once upon a time long, long, ago there lived a young woman who depended upon clients to make ends meet. When business was good…life was fantastic and the world was her oyster.  When business fell off – due to downsizing, sluggish economies, and political upheavals – well, she began to write Odes and other nonsensical utterings…

Continue reading “Ode to the Self-employed”

Bradford Bunny

“Hi, I’m Bradford Bunny,the splotchy skinny bunny called through the fence. “Would you like to be friends?” The bunnies hanging around the clover patch inside the rabbit farm stopped eating and hopped over to where Bradford was sitting.

“Bradford? What kind of name is that for a bunny?” the soft orange bunny with the white ears asked.

All the bunnies began to laugh.

“Braaaaadfurrrd…are you a girl or a boy?” the dark brown bunny teased.  She was laughing so hard she could barely speak.  Of course that sent the other bunnies rolling.

“hahahahahahaha”…the laughing went on for what seemed like forever to Bradford.

“I’m a girl,” Bradford said trying to be confident. “My mother named me Bradford because that was the name of the warren from where she came. She loved her home very much and she loved me too.”

“bahhaaaahaaa…a mommy’s bunny,” a large white and black bunny managed to get out.

Bradford turned and quickly hopped back across the grass to the woods. She could hear the sounds of laughter fading as she went. Tears began to fall.

“I tried to be nice. I tried to ask questions. Still no one wanted to play with me” Bradford Bunny wept more.

When she finished crying, she hopped to the edge of the pond to drink and wash her face. She leaned over and caught sight of her reflection.

I’m so ugly,” she thought.  “I’m brown speckled all over with a huge spot on my nose. No wonder they don’t want to play with me. I don’t want to play with me either.” Bradford began to cry some more.

Oh, why doesn’t anyone love me? Those bunnies have a nice home with friends and plenty of food.  If only I could be like them.”

Bradford went back to the edge of the clearing to watch the bunnies from a distance. She heard the sound of a big truck. It pulled around the farmhouse and stopped in the barnyard. A man spoke with the farmer then went around the truck to open the back.

She heard the little bunnies squeal. “Oh! We’re going on an adventure,” they shouted with delight. All the bunnies happily hopped up into the back of the truck and settled into the tiny packed cages. The door closed.

“An adventure,” sighed Bradford. Tears welled up in her eyes.